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Part 2: Unraveling the Mysteries: Exploring the Magical Artifacts of The Librarian Franchise (H-O)

Updated: May 16


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46. H.G. Wells' Time Machine

  • TV Fact

After The Librarian: Quest for the Spear, the Scorpion League stole the Time Machine. Nicole Noone and Flynn Carsen found it again. Flynn set up the Time Machine to burst after being attacked by ninjas. This sent Nicole 500 years into the past. The machine was likely broken. It looks like H.G. Wells' Time Machine has been fixed up and moved into the Library's Large Collections Annex. People can go to the past or the future with it. The Library doesn't allow time travel, so H.G. Wells' machine was probably taken apart so it couldn't be used and put away in the Time Machine room with another one that had been taken apart. As one of its skills, the Time Machine lets you go to the past or the future. Also, Cassandra Cillian talks about it in "...And the Hidden Sanctuary" when she picks up the book and says it's just a great story and not a true account of events.

  • Fun Fact

The 1895 publication of H.G. Wells' "The Time Machine" is seen as one of the first works of science fiction writing. The book is about an unknown Time Traveller who creates a machine that can go back and forth in time. He travels to the far future with this machine and meets the Eloi, a species that is passive and acts like a kid, along with the Morlocks, who reside underground and eat the Eloi. One interesting thing about "The Time Machine" is that it made time travel with a machine popular. This idea is now common in science fiction. Wells was the first author to show time travel as a mechanical process instead of a magical or mysterious one. This idea has been used as a model for many other works in the same field.


47. Helm of Hermes

  • TV Fact

The Library's Antiquities chamber houses the Helm of Hermes, an artifact. Contact with the Mercury Helm will cause it to detonate.

  • Fun Fact

In Greek mythology, the Helm of Hermes is an object linked to the gods Hades (or Pluto in Roman mythology) and Hermes (or Mercury in Roman mythology). It is also called the Helmet of Hades or the Cap of Invisibility. There are different versions of the stories that say Hermes has a magical helmet that can make someone invisible, like Hades' Helm. Hermes often used his power to disappear as a messenger of the gods. It let him move quickly and without being seen between the human and divine worlds. Some legendary things from Greek mythology, like Zeus' thunderbolt or Poseidon's trident, are better known than the Helm of Hermes. However, it is still an interesting part of the stories about the gods and their amazing powers.


48. Helm of Mercury

  • TV Fact

An ancient Greek item known as the Helm of Mercury can be found in the Library's Antiquities area. As the two halves of the same god, the Romans and the Greeks, were responsible for its creation, it would blow upon touching Hermes's helmet.

  • Fun Fact

Rather than Hermes (Roman mythology's Mercury), the Helm of Hades is most commonly linked with the Greek god Hades or his Roman counterpart, Pluto. Many people call this headgear the Cap of Invisibility. Greek mythology describes the Titanomachy, a war between the Olympian gods and the Titans, as a time when the Cyclops manufactured gifts for the gods, among which was the Helm of Hades. The legend is that who ever wears it will be able to blend in with their surroundings, seeming as nothing at all. The Helm of Hades is mentioned in the myth of Perseus and Medusa, which is a well-known tale involving it. In his mission to kill the Gorgon Medusa, the gods bestowed many gifts to Perseus, one of which was the Helm of Hades, which made him invisible and helped him on his journey.





49. Helm of Poseidon

  • TV Fact

In the Library's Antiquities chamber rests the ancient Greek item known as the Helm of Poseidon.

  • Fun Fact

In Greek mythology, Poseidon is more commonly associated with the sea and earthquakes than with his helmet, which is one of his lesser attributes. Poseidon also has a trident. On the other hand, there are versions of the narrative where Poseidon, the Greek god of the ocean and earthquakes (Neptune in Roman mythology), is shown with a helm or crown proper for a great god. Some depictions of Poseidon in art and myth have him wearing a helmet or crown, signifying his power as a prominent Olympian god and his control over the seas. Nevertheless, the Helm of Poseidon serves more as a metaphor for his heavenly rank and position as master of the waters, as opposed to the invisibility or particular magical abilities linked with the Helm of Hades or other legendary headwear.





50. Hercules' Club

  • TV Fact

Hercules' Club was an artifact that Sterling Lam possessed. We don't know what this thing can do exactly. Charlene, who was centuries old when she easily vanquished Lamb's goons, is thought to have shown that the item considerably increases a person's physical strength.

  • Fun Fact

It is said that the legendary club was carried by the Greek hero Heracles, who was also known as Hercules in Roman mythology. During a mad episode that Zeus's wife Hera induced, Heracles murdered his wife and children. Greek mythology describes him as having been sentenced to a series of twelve labors, which he completed with extraordinary strength. His fabled club, the Heracles' club, has come to symbolize his great strength and ability in battle. On his legendary adventures, it has been depicted on occasion as a massive wooden club that he wields to defeat hordes of monsters and various obstacles. Legend has it that Heracles fashioned the massive club from a wild olive tree, and its weight and heft attest to the hero's extraordinary agility. Whether it's in his battles with the gigantic Antaeus, the Nemean Lion, or the Hydra, Heracles' club is an indispensable instrument in many impressive exploits. Also, it appears in many works of literature, art, and popular culture that depict Heracles's or Hercules's exploits. The emblem of a legendary Greek warrior has become the club, which stands for unfaltering resolve, courage, and durability.





51. Holy Grail

  • TV Fact

The Holy Grail, a chalice from which Jesus Christ allegedly drank wine during the Last Supper, grants immortality and self-reconstruction, allowing it to repair itself if broken, though its extent of damage is unknown.

  • Fun Fact

The Holy Grail is a sacred object in Christian mythology, often linked to chivalry, quests, and medieval romance. It is believed to be the cup used by Jesus Christ during the Last Supper, and Joseph of Arimathea collected Christ's blood in it. The Grail is also associated with miraculous powers, such as healing the sick or providing eternal life. The quest for the Holy Grail became a central theme in Arthurian literature, particularly in King Arthur and the Knights of the Round Table. Knights embark on noble quests to find the Grail, hoping to achieve spiritual enlightenment and divine favor. Over time, the legend of the Holy Grail has been reinterpreted and enriched, becoming intertwined with themes of honor, bravery, redemption, and the pursuit of higher truths.





52. Horologe of the Equinox

  • TV Fact

An artifact that marks the passage of important astronomical bodies, the Horologe of the Equinox will sound a chime when the Binding Equinox draws near.

  • Fun Fact

It seems that the concept of "Horologe of the Equinox" combines aspects of astronomy (equinox) with timekeeping (horologe).


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53. Idol of Agamanzo

  • TV Fact

Hidden within the Temple of Agamanzo was the Idol of Agamanzo. The library now houses the artifact that Flynn Carsen and Eve Baird pilfered from the temple.

  • Fun Fact

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54. Iktomi Dreamcatcher

  • TV Fact

Native American symbol of great power, the Iktomi dreamcatcher grants its wielder the ability to influence the dreams of others. Long ago, nobody could pinpoint its exact whereabouts.

  • Fun Fact

Lakota Sioux mythology includes the figure Iktomi, who is frequently portrayed as a spirit who tricks spiders. The Ojibwe are one Native American group that has the belief that dreamcatchers can protect their wearers from bad dreams by catching them before they fall asleep. According to folklore, a Native American spiritual leader was meditating by a river when Iktomi, disguised as a spider, visited him. Iktomi embellished the leader's willow hoop with feathers and beads before spinning a web, which she explained would trap positive dreams while letting bad ones slip through. Dreamcatchers have their roots in this practice and typically take the form of a round hoop encased in a woven net or web and decorated with feathers and beads. The dreamcatcher, a popular decoration and spiritual protection tool in Native American art and culture, has gained widespread recognition. The dreamcatcher has become popular outside of Native American culture, and as a result, its traditional significance has been lost by some.


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55. James Desmond Wheeler's typewriter

  • TV Fact

The supernatural device known as James Desmond Wheeler's typewriter has the power to transport individuals into the world of cinema. "The Found, The Lost and The Looking," Eve Baird's beloved film, unintentionally dragged Flynn Carsen and herself into its gripping plot. After its recovery, the typewriter was transferred to the Library.

  • Fun Fact

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56. Judas Chalice

  • TV Fact

The Judas Chalice, made of the thirty pieces of silver that were given to Judas Iscariot after he betrayed Jesus Christ, is a sacrilegious relic that serves as a vampire's version of the Holy Grail. For decades, the Chalice—which could grant superhuman strength to any vampire who drank from it—was coveted by many. Then Flynn Carsen gave it to the Library. The chalice seems to possess the power to cure a vampire of any disease or degeneration, even after they have died. When used near midnight, the Chalice will increase the powers of any vampire that drinks from it to an unknown degree. Due to its association with the vampire species, the Chalice possesses an inherent allure for vampires. Vampires get aggressive and their eyes become shiny when they're near it.

  • Fun Fact

Tragically, Judas Iscariot, one of Jesus' twelve apostles, betrayed the Lord Jesus Christ to religious authorities for thirty pieces of silver. This betrayal led to Jesus' execution. Christians mark a turning point in their faith when this betrayal occurs, as mentioned in the Gospels of the New Testament.

A "chalice" is a cup or goblet used at Christian celebrations and other religious events; it is usually decorated with a handle and base. For Christians, its most important function is to symbolize the blood of Jesus Christ in the Holy Communion, also known as the Eucharist. Christians believe that during the Eucharist, the wine in a chalice becomes the true blood of Christ. It is the most important sacrament for Christians because it reminds them of the Last Supper, the meal that Jesus held with his apostles just before he died on the cross.


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57. King Midas

  • TV Fact

Formerly, King Midas was a king. Eventually, his body turned into gold and was kept in The Library. Flynn was just starting his tour of the library when Judson and Carsen walked by the body of King Midas that had been changed. 

  • Fun Fact

Legend has it that the Greek monarch Midas could touch anything and it would magically transform into gold. The legendary King Midas formerly reigned over the Anatolian province of Phrygia (present-day Turkey). In exchange for his hospitality to Silenus, an intoxicated satyr, the gods Dionysus or Bacchus bestowed upon him a wish, depending on the myth's version. It is well-known that Midas wished that his touch could transform anything into gold. He was overjoyed at first, but the drawbacks became apparent when he discovered he could now transform anything into gold—including his daughter and food. Midas asks Dionysus/Bacchus to remove the curse in some tellings of the narrative, and the god or goddess grants his wish. Lots of people take King Midas's story as a lesson about how bad it is to be greedy and how important it is to know what you want before you get it.




58. Kirby Goulding's flower

  • TV Fact

Kirby Goulding's Flower was an innovative magical relic made possible by the accelerated Ley lines. Although Kirby's attempt to woo his childhood sweetheart with the artifact was unsuccessful, it was returned to the Library.

  • Fun Fact

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59. Koschei's Needle

  • TV Fact

You could kill an immortal with a single stroke with Koschei's Needle, a magical relic. It could also kill thousands. The needle had been sought after by many, even Grigori Rasputin. Because Nicole Noone murdered him a century ago—unaware that he had discovered a means of survival in a frail body—Rasputin was seeking the Needle so that he might exact his vengeance. Rasputin tried to murder Nicole with it following its discovery; he was ultimately slain when he pierced the Needle through a radiation-leaking pipe. Radiation killed Rasputin and the Needle.

  • Fun Fact

Koschei the Deathless is a major character in Russian folklore and other Lapp folktales. The bad guy Koschei is very good at magic and can't be killed in any normal way. He goes by many names, such as Koschei the Immortal and Koschei the Deathless. In most stories, Koschei is a wizard or magician who has made himself magical by encasing his soul. Within a web of people and things, his spirit is usually hidden in a needle inside an egg inside a duck inside a hare, and so on. Koschei won't die as long as his spirit is still whole. Usually, Koschei is shown as a bad guy who steals women or causes trouble for heroes. The heroes can't just use force to beat him; they have to use their brains and strategy to find and destroy his soul container.


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60. Libris Fabula

  • TV Fact

The Latin term for a "Book of Fables" is Libris Fabula. Among the Library's Artifacts, it is likely among the most formidable.  The Libris Fabula is a magical story book that can alter reality, drain the listener's life and youth, and open portals when used with the Back Door. It can also turn nearby people into fairy tale characters over time, altering their appearance, clothing, and behavior. In "And the Fables of Doom," each of the Librarians was turned into a fairy tale archetype, such as Cassindra, Jacob, Ezekiel, and Eve. Cassindra, the Prince Charming, made nearby women fall in love and obey her, while Jacob became a skilled hunter and a bird appeared on his arm. Ezekiel became more lucky and heroic, while Eve, the Princess, was able to attract birds, sing, and grow her hair longer. The Libris Fabula's powers are unknown, but it could potentially countermand its own earlier transformations. 

  • Fun Fact

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61. 



Loom of Fate

  • TV Fact

The Loom of Fate is a miniature mystical loom that resides in its very own pocket realm. People can access alternate timelines, like the ones in..., using the Loom. Along with the Fateful Web. The Loom and the River of Time both originate in the same dimension, from whence Time flows.

-Extremely potent magical combinations, such as the combined might of: are required to enter the Loom's dimension.

The Back Door

The Libris Fabula

The Transmitters for Wireless Power

Morgan Le Fay's Advanced Learning Buddy

- Power levels

Chronomancy: The Loom is the embodiment and controller of all past, present, and future events inside the Librarians' universe.

Sentience: The Librarians have hinted that the Loom can aid them in protecting their world by triggering at least some of the extremely improbable circumstances that will lead to their victory.

- Negative Points

As with any fabric, the Loom's can be ripped apart if one gets to it.

Unless someone can mend the cloth, all of time—the past, the present, and the future—will be lost.

Cloth that is at least as ancient as the Loom itself, or The Thread, is required to mend it.

  • Fun Fact

The Loom of Fate is a divine or supernatural loom that spins the yarn of fate for gods, humans, and even the world. The idea has been used in literature and mythology. A powerful symbol of fate, power, and certain death. Norns, who are also called fates, are thought to weave people's fates on a loom in some mythologies, like Norse mythology. In Greek mythology, the Moirai, who are also called the Fates, are powerful beings who spin, measure, and cut the thread of life to decide what happens to both humans and gods. In modern literature, the Loom of Fate has shown up in many forms, but most often as a magical or supernatural artifact that can control or change fates. Take DC Comics' Doctor Fate and his magical loom, the Loom of Fate, which gives him skills that have to do with fate and destiny. The Loom of Fate is a sign of the idea that fate ties us all together in the end.


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62. Magical Flutes of Pan

  • Tv Fact

The legendary Magical Flutes of Pan were supposedly in the possession of the ancient Greeks. The flutes possess the capacity of sentience, enabling them to think and move autonomously, much like Excalibur. Everyone in the area will go to sleep the moment the flute is played. In order to convey its message, the flute can play its own music. No one can get any rest when the flute "talks" through its music.

  • Fun Fact

The symbolic meaning and mythology of the Flutes of Pan originate in classical Greek mythology. The Greek shepherd god Pan often is shown playing the pan flute, sometimes called the syrinx, in various portrayals. The syrinx is typically bound with a series of hollow tubes of varying lengths, often side by side. In an effort to win over the nymph Syrinx, who had been betrayed by her sisters, Pan fashioned the first syrinx from reeds, as the story goes. Listening to the pan flute in a peaceful pastoral environment is a common way for people to unwind and connect with nature. It is believed that the pan flute possesses magical or even telepathic abilities in numerous folklores and cultures.



63. Medusa's Head

  • TV Fact

The head of Medusa is a relic from Ancient Greece. Capabilities Terrifying Stare: Those who dare to look into Medusa's eyes will be quickly transformed into stone.

  • Fun Fact

The iconic head of Medusa is an instantly recognizable symbol in Greek mythology. The legendary Medusa began her career as an altar girl for the lovely Athena. But by succumbing to Poseidon's charms at the Athena temple, she incited the wrath of the goddess. The goddess Athena performed a spell that would force anyone who looked at Medusa's serpentine hair to turn to stone, cursing her afterward. It is said that the mythological hero Perseus was given the duty of killing the serpent Medusa. Athena bestowed a mirror shield upon Perseus, Hermes a pair of winged sandals, and Zeus a sword; with these, he beheaded Medusa while dodging her poisoned stare. People continued to think of Medusa's severed head as a mystical charm even after she died away. One telling of the story has Perseus turning his opponents to stone by wielding Medusa's head as a weapon. There are versions of events where he gave Athena the head, which she then placed on her Aegis shield as a sign of her might and protection. Reflecting the duality of gender and the all-seeing eye, Medusa's head has become a symbol of both danger and safety.



64. Mimiko's Mirror

  • TV Fact

The Mirror of Mimiko There are few items in The Library as rare as this one. Its mystical powers are a mystery, but word on the street is that they are formidable. Its magical qualities were not demonstrated, despite its critical importance to the plot of "And the Self-Fulfilling Prophecy," its debut episode. Just like a mirror, it may reflect light. Therefore, it is capable of transmitting messages in Morse Code.

  • Fun Fact

Originally from Japan, Mimiko's Mirror is a fascinating folktale. Ancient tales tell of Mimiko, the mysterious and beautiful "Queen of the Night," who resides in the depths of the forest. According to urban legend, Mimiko possesses a magical mirror that allows her to see through anyone's pretense. Some people think that mirrors reveal more than just a person's outside appearance; they can also reveal their deepest wishes, intentions, and thoughts. If one is courageous enough to peer into Mimiko's Mirror, it may reveal their destiny or future, according to certain versions of the story; nevertheless, those who do so must confront their own secrets. However, there is a warning labeled to the mirror's powers. If you're not yet prepared to accept yourself as you are, Mimiko's Mirror, so the legend goes, can drive you mad. The mirror is often depicted as both a source of guidance and a danger because it represents the duality of self-awareness and the dangers of confronting one's own inner demons.


65. Mother Goose Treaty of 1918

  • TV Fact

The power of story is immense. Elizabeth Goose wrote a terrible spellbook in 1719 when she released a children's book with a series of spells that rhymed. Weakening the impending catastrophe, the librarian of that era succeeded in disposing of all but one copy of the book; that copy stayed with Elizabeth Goose and her family. At this very now, bizarre events are transpiring all around the globe. A sudden blast of wind knocks a tree trimmer from his perch in Florida, while a group of eyeless mutant rodents assault a woman in rural Pennsylvania, and a professor from England gets stuck inside a prize pumpkin at a farmer's market. Cassandra, Ezekiel, and Stone must find the lost spellbook before the rhymes' full power can be unleashed; this is because Baird and her team of librarians believe that Mother Goose's magic is once again loose in the world. Flynn has gone missing after all.

Fun Fact

  • It is an invented treaty, the "Mother Goose Treaty of 1918". It combines, lightheartedly, elements of history and mythology. Mother Goose isn't attributed with any treaties, but she is a figure who appears often in children's literature and nursery rhymes. Imagine, then, what such an agreement might include if it were real. Perhaps agreements amongst various figures from fairy tales or nursery rhymes would define standards for narrative or character behavior in each story. It might be a wacky way to look at the connections between mythology.



66. Munchausen Top

  • TV Fact

It is a magical artifact that can be used to find treasure

  • Fun Fact

An intriguing concept that blends legendary elements with the real-life Baron Munchausen, the "Munchausen Top" lacks any discernible cultural or historical background. In the late 18th and early 19th centuries, German writer Rudolf Erich Raspe created the fictional Baron Munchausen. The real-life figure Hieronymus Karl Friedrich, Freiherr von Münchhausen, who was renowned for his fanciful stories and exaggerated storytelling, was his inspiration. In Baron Munchausen's stories, unbelievable adventures and feats are typical. A "Munchausen Top" could be a spinning top toy inspired by Baron Munchausen's fanciful tales. Perhaps the design features elaborate engravings or illustrations of some of his most famous achievements, such as riding cannonballs or visiting the moon. Maybe even a system that reproduces Munchausen's fantastical music and sound effects is hidden inside.


67. Mystery Houses

  • TV Fact

All tales and beliefs about haunting houses have their origins in the enchanted structures known as the Mystery Houses. The Heisserer Index contains the Mystery Houses. These houses, says Jenkins, are the inspiration for all the urban legends about haunted houses, from the one on the hill to the one about the psychopath stalking the sorority house. The approach employed to identify the houses is a point of contention, he acknowledges.

Houses with a Mysterious Past

At this time, four mystery houses are operational, while the fifth is dormant:

The Dionaea House

The House of Refuge (also known as the Shatterbox)

The Soul Cage

The Ur Adobe

The Final Rest (inactive; destroyed in 1350)

The Dionaea House is based on a story by the same name as the Heisserer Index—a multimedia work by author Eric Heisserer.

One possible allusion to Tolkien's Middle-earth Imladris—also known as Rivendell or The Last Homely House—could be found in The Final Rest.

The stories of the Dionaea House and "that one house" that the neighborhood kids found scary came together to form the basis of the classic haunted house.

  • Fun Fact

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68. Nautilus Submarine

  • TV Fact

A state-of-the-art submarine, the Nautilus was constructed in the 1800s. Built to withstand the tremendous pressures encountered in the ocean's deepest areas, it possesses tremendous durability and power. It was an early device that harnessed atomic energy; its name was nuclear propulsion.

  • Fun Fact

Jules Verne's science fiction classic "Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea" features the fictional Nautilus submarine. In this book from 1870 by Verne, the enigmatic and secretive captain Nemo abducts Professor Pierre Aronnax, his attendant Conseil, and the Canadian whaler Ned Land. Many people think the Nautilus was a revolutionary submarine because of how advanced it was technologically and how well it was designed. Its electric propulsion mechanism allows it to stay underwater for extended durations, allowing it to study the ocean floor. Its sleek, contemporary form incorporates novel features like as powerful searchlights, viewing windows, and a propulsion system. In the hands of Captain Nemo, the Nautilus sets out on a perilous but fascinating voyage across the ocean, where it discovers underwater forests, enormous squid, and priceless relics, among other things. Symbolic of humanity's voracious need for knowledge and discoveries, the Nautilus is more than meets the eye throughout the novel.


69. Necromancer's Manual

TV Fact

There is a book called The Necromancer's Manual that is kept in the Library. Even if it doesn't appear on the show, it could likely create Zombies and bring the dead back to life

Fun Fact

A wide range of subjects may be covered in these fictional works' Necromancer's Manuals, including:

- Guide to Calling on the Living Dead: Learn how to call upon and command a wide variety of living dead, including zombies, skeletons, and spectral beings.

- The practice of divination and mediumship involves rituals that allow one to communicate with the spirits of the departed to gain insight into the hereafter.

-"Curse and Hexcraft" refers to the practice of using spells and incantations to harm one's opponents, influence one's destiny, or call upon evil spirits.

- By "soul magic," we mean practices that include the cultivation and manipulation of souls for the sake of necromantic ritual fuel or personal empowerment.

- Magic that protects from the spirit world and magic that defends against hostile beings are two branches of magic.

- Mysteries and esoterica surrounding the most sinister parts of necromancy and death.

Those who would do anything to get their hands on the Necromancer's Manual often portray it as a banned and potentially deadly item in many fictional universes. Many believe it warns of the dangers of seeking answers to existential questions by way of enigmatic diagrams, obscure symbols, and ominous incantations contained inside its pages.


70. Nemesis Star

  • TV Fact

The Sun Room of The Library was the prison cell for the celestial body dubbed the Nemesis Star in 1952. Like other big stars, Nemesis is continually emitted a tremendous amount of light and heat from its explosive explosions. That is why the Sun Room is a hostile and inaccessible area. To the fullest extent possible. To harness the energy generated by the Nemesis Star, one must take the proper precautions, such as wearing a full-body heatproof suit and heatproof gloves, as well as utilizing powerful and robust mirrors to direct the star's rays. Make sure there are no other people around as well. According to stories told inside the universe, famous scientists Albert Einstein and Richard Feynman are said to have captured the Nemesis Star in The Library. Because the Nemesis Star's heat and light can't be felt outside of the Sun Room, we can assume that it is located in a pocket realm.

  • Fun Fact

The "Nemesis Star" is a made-up star in astronomy that, in theory, orbits the Sun. An concept was created out of the observation that global catastrophic extinctions tend to happen 26-30 million years apart. Concerned scientists have proposed the "Nemesis" effect, in which a faraway partner star's gravitational impact on our Sun is modeled. A tiny, dim star—perhaps a red or brown dwarf—with an extremely elongated orbit around the Sun would be Nemesis, according to this idea. The Oort Cloud comets, a group of icy bodies located on the outer solar system, would experience periodic orbital disruptions caused by its gravitational pull, which might cause some of them to collide with objects in the inner solar system. These comet interactions could trigger a devastating extinction event on Earth. Although the Nemesis idea is fascinating, examinations of stars other than the Sun have not yet provided proof of its existence. There has been no discovery of anything that even remotely approaches Nemesis. To explain the regularity of mass extinctions, other theories try to use solar system or galaxy dynamics. Even though astronomers find this theory of the Nemesis Star intriguing, it has not been proved. This has been, and will remain, a powerful incentive for studying the inner workings of our solar system and the potential impact of aliens on Earth's history.


71. Noah's Ark

  • TV Fact

Artifacts like Noah's Ark are quite large and housed in the Library's Large Collections Annex.

  • Fun Fact

Most people are familiar with the story of Noah's ark from Genesis. God, according to the narrative, saw how dirty the planet was and chose to flood it in order to wash away all the immorality and bloodshed. To build the ark that would save him, his family, and pairs of every sort of animal from the devastation that the deluge brought about, God selected the righteous man, Noah. In accordance with God's will, Noah constructed the enormous ark. Noah and his family had gathered an assortment of animals, including two of each kind, and they loaded them all onto the ark. The sky was covered with rain for forty days and forty nights, and the precipitation reached the highest mountains. Noah dispatched a dove to locate dry land once the water level had dropped. When the dove returned with an olive branch, Noah realized the floods had subsided. Upon reaching Mount Ararat, Noah and his family disembarked from the ark to begin repopulating Earth. Many associate God's wrath with the flood myth, but it is also a tale of God's faithfulness and kindness that saved humanity.



72. Nwyfre Runestone

  • TV Fact 

The librarians took the Nwyfre Runestone from a gang of enraged Druids and placed it in The Library. No one knows what magical powers the Nwyfre Runestone possesses just yet.

  • Fun Fact

The Nwyfre Runestone is not well-known among historians and archaeologists. It might be a piece of fiction, an idle rumor, or a reference to anything far-fetched.  The name "Nwyfre" has its roots in Welsh and Celtic mythology, which is worth noting. The Welsh word nwyfre, meaning "sky" or "heaven," is used frequently in neo-pagan and Druidic traditions to describe the life-giving force that is present in all living things.


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73. Oni bell

TV Fact

Every time it is rung, the Oni Bell, a relic, calls forth demons.

Fun Fact

Rather than being based on real historical artifacts or occurrences, the "Oni Bell" seems to be a term with mythological or fictional origins. The Oni Bell can also be seen as a mystical relic connected to the Oni if you wish to incorporate it into a tale or idea for worldbuilding. Monsters and ogres are common representations of the Oni, mythical creatures from Japanese folklore. Depending on the fictional setting, the Oni Bell may have the power to grant or grant no wishes, cast spells, or even attract or fend off Oni. Whether it's an heirloom coveted by adventurers, a source of contention among different factions, or some other historical relic, its origin and significance can be intricately woven into your narrative.




74. Opal of Samara

  • TV Fact

The legendary artifact called the Opal of Samara can summon demons, but it lacks the power to control them. Following its recovery from Jerusalem by the Teutonic knights during the Third Crusade, the Opal was later hoarded in Berlin by the Nazi occult division. The stone was kept in a magical safe due to its valuable and possibly dangerous powers, including its ability to summon demons without control. It is possible that the safe's combination is an alphanumeric code made up of two components that originate from Latin Bible passages, particularly the Stations of the Cross. The enchanted safe containing the opal was broken into during Flynn Carsen's initial meeting with Eve Baird, who was on a mission to locate and detonate a nuclear weapon. He succeeded in defusing the safe's trap despite Flynn's greatest attempts to prevent it. The opal should now be kept in the library. Once called, the demons possessed by the Opal of Samara are completely unpredictable.

  • Fun Fact

Samara could be a nod to the Russian city of Samara or have some other historical or cultural significance, while opal is a gemstone known for its iridescent dance of color. It is possible to view the "Opal of Samara" as a magical artifact endowed with remarkable abilities by combining these elements. You are free to create a fictional universe in which the Opal of Samara plays an important role and explores its history, magic, and significance. It may be a legendary diamond that bestows good fortune or grants wishes to its possessor. It could also be a cursed or harmful artifact, or that influential entities are attempting to conceal its secrets. Could you define the Opal of Samara, describe how your characters come into contact with it, and explain how it changes their lives and the world around them in your narrative? No matter what your objective is—finding it, using it, or discovering its secrets—the opal is sure to be an adventure.



75. Osiris Stone

  • TV Fact

Ancient Egyptians believed that the Osiris Stone could grant wishes to the souls of the deceased. The discovery of this creature in the tar pits was prompted by its ability to reanimate several saber-tooth tigers. Once the stone was located, it was given to the Library.

  • Fun Fact

Based on what we know about Egyptian mythology and the god Osiris, the "Osiris Stone" seems to be an imaginary idea. Osiris, a major figure in ancient Egyptian religion, was linked to fertility, the afterlife, and the resurrection. Typical depictions of him included a mummified pharaoh donning the Atef crown and brandishing the royal crook and flail. Imagine the Osiris Stone in your story as a magical relic connected to the legend of Osiris. A jewel bestowed with heavenly power, an artifact from Osiris' rule, or a clue to the secrets of the hereafter could all be inside it. When you're coming up with ideas for the Osiris Stone, keep these things in mind:

What was the source of the Osiris Stone? Did the gods bestow it upon Osiris, or did some long-ago ceremony shape it? Were any special powers bestowed upon the Osiris Stone? Does it allow one to live forever, manipulate nature, or communicate with the afterlife? How does the Osiris Stone figure into many folklores? Is its origin story, historical trajectory, or place in the Egyptian pantheon well-documented? What makes the Osiris Stone significant? Who wants it more: mortals looking for power, priests protecting it as a holy relic, or supernatural entities keeping it safe? Is it possible that your narrative will center around a journey to discover the Osiris Stone? Tell me about the people involved and the obstacles they have to overcome to get there.




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